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The news of the year has often been surprising and occasionally been shocking. In the world of cloud computing, the surprises have come in the form of innovative, clever ways cloud technology is being put to use. From facilitating live-streaming video from space missions to enabling medical professionals to engage with patients in unforeseen ways, cloud computing had a huge impact on the year. And by all indications, there’s plenty more to come. Much of the cloud computing news of 2016 focused on exponential growth in need and demand, which will reach into the following year and beyond. That growth, along with integrating cloud computing into existing infrastructure, was clearly on the mind of many Thoughts on Cloud readers in 2016 It is easy to donate a car to charity if all you want to do is get rid of it. Simply call a charity that accepts old vehicles and it will tow your heap away. But if you want to maximize your tax benefits, it is more complicated. Here is a walk-through of some of the considerations, with the usual proviso that you should discuss these issues with your tax prepare before you act. You Must Itemize Your Return If you want to claim a car donation to reduce your federal income taxes, you must itemize deductions. You could itemize even if the donated auto is your only deduction, but that is usually not the best choice. Here is the math: Suppose you are in the 28 percent tax bracket and the allowable deduction for the vehicle donation is $1,000. That will save you $280 in taxes. If you are in the 15 percent tax bracket and you get that same $1,000 deduction, it will reduce your taxes by $150. If the car donation is your only deduction, it is likely that taking a standard deduction would save you thousands more dollars in taxes. The only way that donating a car nets you any tax benefit is if you have many deductions and if their total, including the car, exceeds the standard deduction. And remember, you can always donate as much as you want to charities, but the IRS limits how much you can claim on your tax return.